Use “CPR” on prospect objections

This is an interesting read about handling sales objections.

It relates specifically to the insurance industry but a lot of what is covered is relevant to all other sorts of sales scenarios as well.

Hope you take the time to have a look.

Greg


Many insurance sales professionals fear, or worse—hate—handling objections. What you tell yourself at the moment you field an objection is critical. Is it something negative: “This is the part of the job I really hate,” or “Oh no! …

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Overcoming objections by turning them into the fuel for selling …

This article makes a few good points but I dislike referring to objections as “the battlefield” for sales people.

 

 

 

via overcoming objections – Google Blog Search by The Leads Explorer on 10/20/09


8 Responses to “Overcoming objections by turning them into the fuel for selling”. Mockingbird says: Knowing how to field objections can go a long way in good marketing of your product or service, as you truly understand your business …

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Sales Objections Overruled

Hi, just read this post and liked Craig’s comments about “Blocked at the Gate”

Greg

http://www.managesmarter.com/msg/content_display/sales/e3ic693b2e714b022aa71a7117730321b54
Sales Objections Overruled

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Sales Objections – How to Have Fewer Objections Come Up

Of course, I said before that if you had a perfect product (or service) and gave a perfect presentation then sales objections would not come up.

It follows from that, that the better you understand your product/service and your prospect and the better the job of “selling” you do the fewer objections you will get.

By “selling” I mean:

·        Establishing rapport with your prospect.

·        Establishing credibility with your prospect.

·        Uncover your prospect’s wants and what’s important to them about that.

·        Understand your prospect as a person and how they think

·        Establishing the Value of your offer

If you have done all that you can present your offering so that they will really listen to it and your presentation will be focused on the specific benefits of importance to them.

In fact, let me put it this way, the better you have identified your customer’s wants and established the value of your offer the fewer sales objections you will get.

So, in some respects knowing how to handle objections is like an insurance policy.

We all have insurance policies on our cars and houses and even our life but we really hope we never have to use them.

So, think of your skill in handling sales objections as something you can fall back on even if you have not done a great “selling” job earlier in the sale.

 

An interesting post on sales objections.

 

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Sales Objections – “Compared to what?”

 As I’ve mentioned before sales objections are an integral part of the sales process because no product or service is a perfect fit.

 Even those sales people who tell you they never get objections will tell you they ask a lot of questions and have a long discussion with the prospect to define their needs and determine if the product is a match for them.

 Now the issues discussed during that questioning process are objections, these sales people just don’t call them objections because they were not accompanied by a “No” following a request to buy. But make no mistake, we are talking about the same thoughts in the mind of our prospect and these thoughts are a barrier to them ordering.

 Often a prospect will say, 

“Your product is too…”

Maybe it’s “too big” or “too slow” or “too expensive” or “too old” or “too complicated”

 A good response to this sort of sales objection is,

“Compared to what?”

 You see whenever we make a decision (like to buy product X or product Y, or even not to buy anything at all) we have to first make an evaluation and evaluations are based on comparisons.

 For example how much better will my life be with this new appliance versus how much more complicated will my life be with the addition of this new appliance? Or, how does this car compare to my current car, is it faster or safer or more economical or more reliable or does it look better?

 So, because every comment like “it’s too big” is based on a comparison, you need to understand what the prospect is comparing your offer to so that you can respond. Otherwise you are responding without really understanding what the prospect is talking about and you can waste a lot of time doing that.

 Once you understand the prospect’s comparison you can focus on what is important to them and either reposition your offer to be more like what they want or point out the flaws in the other product or even the disadvantages of not buying anything at all.

 Just remember when responding to sales objections like this to use the Agreement Frame we have mentioned previously.

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